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College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences

CLASS Course Descriptions


CLASS Course Descriptions

Below is a list of courses from the Course Catalog for the College of Liberal Arts & Social Science.


Download CLASS Course Outlines

  • AN222 Biological Anthropology
    Offered: As Resources Permit
    This course surveys the subfield of modern Biological (Physical) Anthropology, with a focus on the study and interpretation of human and non-human primate evolution, contemporary human biological diversity, and the bicultural, ecological and historical dynamics of selective factors including diseases that have impacted – and continue to impact on – the human condition. A three-hour weekly lab is required.
  • AN222 Biological Anthropology
    Credits: 4.00 , Offered: As Resources Permit
    This course surveys the subfield of modern Biological (Physical) Anthropology, with a focus on the study and interpretation of human and non-human primate evolution, contemporary human biological diversity, and the bicultural, ecological and historical dynamics of selective factors including diseases that have impacted – and continue to impact on – the human condition. A three-hour weekly lab is required.
  • AN234 Linguistic Anthropology
    Credits: 3.0 , Offered: Fall
    This course presents linguistic questions, methods, and tools used within anthropology with special attention to the relation between Oceanic language and culture. Participants will develop an introductory understanding of the profound implications that language has for the formation maintenance, and change of cultural practices and social events.
  • AN262 Basic Field Methods of Archaeology
    Offered: Spring / Even Years
    This course offers an introduction to the basic field methods and techniques employed in the archaeological site survey, mapping, sampling, excavation, and recording of cultural remains. This is an intensive field course where students will learn through guided participation, mentored by practicing archaeologists.
  • AN262 Basic Field Methods of Archaeology
    Credits: 3.00 , Offered: Spring / Even Years
    This course offers an introduction to the basic field methods and techniques employed in the archaeological site survey, mapping, sampling, excavation, and recording of cultural remains. This is an intensive field course where students will learn through guided participation, mentored by practicing archaeologists.
  • AN320 People of the Pacific
    Credits: 3.00 , Offered: Spring
    AN320 is a study of the cultural anthropology of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia, the most ethnographically diverse region on the planet. Themes may include art, colonialism, ethnocentrism, first contact, gender, inequality, intoxication, power, race relations, religion, ritual, social change, sorcery and tattooing.
  • AN320 People of the Pacific
    Credits: 3.0 , Offered: Spring
    AN320 is a study of the cultural anthropology of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia, the most ethnographically diverse region on the planet. Themes may include art, colonialism, ethnocentrism, first contact, gender, inequality, intoxication, power, race relations, religion, ritual, social change, sorcery and tattooing.
  • AN321 Visual Anthropology
    Credits: 3.0 , Offered: Spring
    Visual Anthropology combines filmic theory and practice towards new understandings of cultural anthropology and contemporary society. This course offers undergraduates an opportunity to creatively engage in the direction and production of ethnographic films regarding issues affecting themselves and their community.
  • AN325 Prehistory of the Pacific Basin
    Credits: 3.0 , Offered: Fall / Even Years
    The story of the colonization of the Pacific Islands is one of the most remarkable in global prehistory. This is only the beginning of the story. Life in the Pacific brought with it unique circumstances and challenges, which were faced and overcome in a variety of different ways. This course investigates our understandings about the original colonization of the various Pacific Island groups, including the Marianas, and follows the relationships and developments of these various island peoples through time.
  • AN325 Prehistory of the Pacific Basin
    Credits: 3.00 , Offered: Fall / Even Years
    The story of the colonization of the Pacific Islands is one of the most remarkable in global prehistory. This is only the beginning of the story. Life in the Pacific brought with it unique circumstances and challenges, which were faced and overcome in a variety of different ways. This course investigates our understandings about the original colonization of the various Pacific Island groups, including the Marianas, and follows the relationships and developments of these various island peoples through time.

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