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East Asian Studies

College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences


College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences
East Asian Studies Program

 

What is East Asian Studies?

As the world enters the Pacific Century, East Asia is of increasing importance to the United States and the world. This is a part of the world that we must try to understand if we are to play a role in both world politics and economics. Coordinating courses offered in diverse departments of the University and maintaining a roster of over ten full-time faculty members whose teaching and professional work focus on East Asia, the program simply is one of UOG’s most extensive area studies programs. Offering a BA degree and a minor, the curriculum is constructed upon a multi-cultural examination of perennial questions and issues concerning the culture, history, literature, politics, philosophy and economy of East Asia. The courses, which are not only about countries within East Asia but also comparative and broader in scope, emphasize cultural, historical understanding, and a critical reasoning approach to train students to function more wisely and competently in the increasingly globalizing world. Students who obtain a major or minor in EAS have increased their value on the job market and broadened their career prospects.

 

Why Study East Asia?

East Asia, our neighbor, comprising China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia, is home to almost one-third of the world’s people, the most populous area of the world.

East Asia contains the world’s oldest continuous civilizations. When the ancestors of modern Europeans lived in preliterate tribal cultures, East Asian countries were highly advanced.

East Asia is the most dynamic region in today’s world; economic change in East Asia has dwarfed what has taken place elsewhere. At a time when the roads and stores are filled with Japanese cars and Chinese goods, it is no longer necessary to argue for East Asia’s economic importance.

In political and strategic terms the United States links with East Asia are critical. Ezra F. Vogel, the director of Harvard’s Fairbank Center for East Asian Research said, “China could well become the most important country to the U.S., for better or for worse, more important even than Japan, Mexico, Canada, or Russia.”

Students with East Asia knowledge are therefore highly valued in government, diplomacy, commerce, academia, the legal profession, finance, service industries, etc.

 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (Total: 43 credit hours)

Required Courses (31 credit hours):

16 credit hours in Chinese or Japanese selected from CI101, CI102, CI201, CI202, JA1O1, JA1O2, JA1O5, JA1O6, JA2O1, JA202;

3 credit hours selected from HI371 and HI372;

3 credit hours selected from AR322, EN470 (when the primary focus is East Asia), or MU3O1;

6 credit hours selected from HI474, HI476, HI480 (when the primary focus is East Asia), PI480 and PI 481(when the primary focus is East Asia); PI486 (when the destination is East Asia), PS304 or PS485, and 3 credit hours from BA341.

 

Electives (12 Credit hours):

Selected from among the courses listed above or CI301, CI302, CI401, CI402, JA3O1, JA302, JA401, JA402, C0310, BA 460, PI103 (when the primary focus is East Asia), or -90 series courses and transfer credits (when the primary focus is East Asia).

 

MINOR REQUIREMENTS (Total: 28 credit hours)

Required Courses (22 credit hours):

16 credit hours in Chinese or Japanese selected from CI1Ol, CI102, CI201, CI202, JA1Ol, JA1O2, JA1O5, JA1O6, JA2O1, JA202;

6 credit hours selected from HI371, HI372, HI474, HI476 or PI480(when the topic is East Asia).

Electives (6 credit hours): ?Selected from the above or AR322, CI301, CI302, CI401, CI402, JA3O1, JA302, JA4O1, JA402, C0310, EN470 (when the primary focus is East Asia), HI480 (when the primary focus is East Asia), PI486 (when the destination is East Asia), BA341, BA460, MU301, PI103 PI480, PI481 (when the primary focus is East Asia), PI486 (when the destination is East Asia), PS304, PS485, or -90 series courses and transfer credits (when the primary focus is East Asia).

 

UOG East Asian Studies Scholarship Fund

The purpose of the East Asian Studies Scholarship Fund is to promote East Asian Studies at UOG, and to give financial support to East Asian Studies students who show potential and promise of pursuing a career in East Asian Studies (EAS).

The East Asian Studies Scholarship Fund will be managed by the UOG Endowment Foundation. The EAS Scholarship Awards Committee will be composed of at least two (2) faculty members from East Asian Studies and the Director of East Asian Studies. The Awards Committee will meet at least once in a school year, usually in the Fall semester, before October 15th.

Ideally IF funds permit, the EAS Scholarship Awards Committee would like to award, at least, two (2) scholarships each year, but it may award more, if funds permit, according to the following criteria: Only East Asian Studies Majors are eligible to receive the EAS Scholarship. In the even that there are no majors, then a student minoring in EAS will be consider eligible.

If funds permit, then a ONE-THOUSAND DOLLAR ($1000.00) SCHOLARSHIP will be given to the EAS major who has the highest total Grade Point Average (GPA) with at least a total GPA of 3.5, and who shows potential and promise of pursuing a career in East Asian studies.

If funds permit, then a FIVE HUNDRED DOLLAR ($500.00) SCHOLARSHIP will be given to the EAS major who has the second highest total GPA with at least a 3.0, and who shows potential and promise of pursuing a career in East Asian studies.

In the event that there are two or more student applicants for the scholarship who are equal in all aspects, then the Awards Committee may decide to either share the scholarship award evenly between the students, or flip a coin to determine the recipient.

In the event that the EAS majors (or minors) do not meet the minimum GPA for the first and second place awards, then EAS students with a GPA of at least a 2.2 will be considered eligible for a scholarship award of TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS ($200.00).

In the event that it takes more than TEN (10) months to raise HUNDRED DOLLARS ($500.00), then when the "East Asian Studies Scholarship" fund has at least FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($500.00) in it, then the East Asian Studies faculty will organize a Scholarship Awards Committee, and select scholarship awardees, according to these guidelines.

In the event that there are no EAS majors or minors for at least five (5) years, the EAS awards committee should use the funds to purchase books or other learning aids for the UOG Library.

Or in the event that the EAS program, both the major and minor, are expunged from the UOG catalog, then the Chair of Humanistic Studies (or its equivalent, if the university units are restructured) should organize a faculty committee to use the remaining funds to purchase books or other learning aids for the UOG library.

Blakemore Freeman Fellowship for Advanced Language Study?Blakemore Freeman Fellowship is a language grant for one year of East Asian language study in East Asian countries.

 

Eligibility:

To be eligible for a grant, an applicant must:

  • Be pursuing an academic, professional or business career that involves the regular use of a modern East or Southeast Asian language
  • Have a college undergraduate degree
  • Be at or near an advanced level in the language as defined below.
  • Be able to devote oneself exclusively to language study during the term of the grant; grants are not made for part-time study
  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the United States

 

For more information, see http://www.blakemorefoundation.org/

 

The Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship

The Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship is a grant for Asian and Pacific Islander American students to pursue higher education. For more information, see http://www.apiasf.org/.

 

The EAS Collection

The EAS Studies Room, sponsored by a generous grant from Mobil Oil (Guam), is located on the first floor of the RFK library. The collection contains books, journals and other materials concerning the history, politics, literature, and art of China, Japan and Korea in both English and East Asian languages.

 

Degree Program Requirements

 

 

Faculty Contact Information

 

Dr. Yao-xin Chang
Literature
B.A. Nankai Univ.; Advanced Studies, London/Cambridge Univ.; Ph.D., Temple Univ.
EC 216B
735-2737
yaochang@uguam.uog.edu
His research and teaching interests include Chinese and comparative literature.

 

Dr. Richard S. Colfax
Business
B.S. Sophia Univ.; M.A., Azusa Pacific Univ.; M.A., Ph.D., Fielding Institute Japan
ITC Bld. 1
735-2534
rcolfax@uguam.uog.edu
He specializes in Japanese management.

 

Dr. Curtis Rigsby
Philosophy
MA Philosophy, MA Theology, MA Applied Linguistics/TESOL (BIOLA University)
PhD, Philosophy, University of Hawaii
HSS 12OJ
735-2818
crigsby@uguam.uog.edu
He specializes in Japanese philosophy, in particular, the Kyoto School and Buddhist-Christian dialogue, but he has also studied Indian and Chinese philosophy. 

 

Dr. Michael Griffin
Communication
A.A., College of Alameda; B.A., M.A., San Francisco State Univ.; Ed.D. Univ. of San Francisco
EC 213D
735-2703
mgriffin@uguam.uog.edu
He specializes in East Asian and comparative communication methods and styles.

 

Dr. Yuka Iwata
Japanese
B.A., Chukyo Univ.; M.A., Univ. of Memphis; Ph.D., Univ. of Mississippi HSS 120B}
735-2804
yiwata@uguam.uog.edu
Her teaching and research interests include sociolinguistics, Japanese communication, business Japanese and Japanese as a second language. 

 

Dr. Toyoko Kang
Japanese
B.A., M.A., Kobe University of Foreign Studies; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
HSS 318F
735-2803
pjkang@uguam.uog.edu
She specializes in Language Acquisition, Psycholinguistics and Theoretical Linguistics.

 

Dr. Masumi Kai
Japanese
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Osaka Univ. of Foreign Studies
HSS 120G
472-0403
kai@uguam.uog.edu
Her primary areas of expertise are Japanese Linguistics and Colonial Education of Japanese.

 

Dr. Ning Li
Public Administration
B.S., Peking University; M.S., Chinese Academy of sciences; Ph.D., George Mason University
DC 30
735-2526
nli@uguam.uog.edu
His teaching and research interests include Public Policy Analysis, Public Administration, Science, Technology, and Economic Growth and International Trade Policy

 

Dr. James D. Sellmann
Philosophy
B.A., B.A. Univ. of Nevada; M.A., M.A., Ph.D., Univ. of Hawaii
Philosophy,
735-2807/2854
jsellman@uguam.uog.edu
His research interests focus on Chinese Philosophy and religion. Dr. Sellmann is also the Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.

 

Dr. Kim R. Skoog
Philosophy
B.A., Univ. of Minnesota; M.A. Univ. of Washington; Ph.D., University of Hawaii
HSS 312
735-2811
kskoog@uguam.uog.edu
He specializes in Asian philosophy.