UOG instructor brings simulated training to nursing students in Palau

UOG instructor brings simulated training to nursing students in Palau

UOG instructor brings simulated training to nursing students in Palau


7/30/2019

 

First-year Palau Community College nursing students with Terry Ngirmang, and Veronica Alave
First-year Palau Community College nursing students with PCC’s Terry Ngirmang, third from right, and UOG’s Veronica Alave, second from right.

Nursing students at Palau Community College are once again able to practice important core skills of nursing on life-sized manikins following a visit from University of Guam nursing instructor Veronica B. Alave.

Alave, who is well-versed in simulation education as the coordinator of the skills lab at the UOG School of Nursing & Health Sciences, traveled to Palau to assemble Laerdal Essential Simulation manikins and train students how to use them. The manikins are wireless human patient simulators with life-like features that allow students to practice skills related to airway and breathing management and cardiac and circulation functions.

The simulators were donated to Palau Community College from the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s School of Nursing after the college’s previous ones were vandalized. Alave was also able to repair one of the vandalized manikins.

“These simulators provide students with a necessary level of training in order to deliver a high quality of care to people in the community,” said Margaret Hattori-Uchima, dean of UOG’s School of Nursing & Health Sciences. “This was a great opportunity for us to share our resources for the betterment of health care on a neighboring island.”

Palau Community College has 20 students enrolled in its nursing program this year.

The trip and technical assistance were possible through a Health Resources & Services Administration grant obtained by the Guam/Micronesian Area Health Education Center. The center, otherwise known as AHEC, works out of UOG’s School of Nursing & Health Sciences to improve health care in underserved communities by increasing the number and quality of skills of health care workers.

“The nursing students and I now know how to reassemble our manikins and use them for nursing skill practices, and we thank Vicky Alave, Margaret Hattori-Uchima, and UOG for their continued support and assistance,” said Terry Ngirmang, director of the Nursing Program at Palau Community College.